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EVENT PROGRAM

#CGCSASUMMIT2021

Thursday

14 October 2021

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09:15
Sponsor Video
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09:25

Ms Zanele Morrison

MC Remarks

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09:30

Mr Grattan Kirk

CGCSA Co-Chair Opening Remarks

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09:40

Mr Bruno Pietracci

Setting the Tone

Covid 19’s unprecedented impact has devasted economies and massively impacted communities worldwide. Coca Cola as a global company operated across multiple geographies. How has the Coca-Cola system responded to Covid-19 related challenges across Africa and other emerging markets and serve as a key player in the economic recovery journey. Lesson Learnt.

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10:00

Mr Tom Mkhwanazi

Ms Sebe Rasebitse

Ms Queen Munyai

Ms Nokuthula Selamolela

Panel:

Building Dynamic Teams to Drive Business Objectives: Linking Human Capital to Productivity

Without a doubt, COVID-19 has upended business models and the way companies manage human capital and develop skills for future growth. In many respects, Covid-19 has demanded a rapid response from companies and to quickly adapt to new ways of working, but also responding to competition, customer needs and even the regulatory environment. What has become clear is that those companies who are agile and can easily adapt to the changes being experienced globally will survive. But this requires a paradigm shift on how companies manage, develop and nurture talent and skills which are fundamental to driving business growth. What then are the “must-do” deliverables companies should and must embrace in order to drive business growth? To what extent are SA companies prepared for this fundamental imperative which will determine their ability to succeed in a fast-changing marketplace, where digital technology and collaboration, disruptive forces due to artificial intelligence and automation, will make the difference between success and failure?

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10:30

Ms Jenny Pather

Transforming the Sector, retailing through convenience

South Africa has arguably one of the largest retail markets in sub-Sahara Africa, which has over the years adopted and benchmarked its service and offering to meet international standards and trends. The sector plays an integral role in the economic development and growth of the country, and is and continues to be one of the largest employers. Like other sectors of the economy, retail has borne the brunt of the Covid-19 pandemic, and has experienced significant disruption to its operations, business models and supply chains. There are however lessons to be learnt, particularly on how to provide a better retailing convenience for consumers by adopting agile and customer-centric business models to ensure better convenience for the customer. Without a doubt, there is potential for the sector to grow, particularly given prospects of further economic growth, the emergence of new consumer groups and capital investment aided by favourable government policies. How then can the sector embrace these opportunities to offer a retailing convenience for consumers?

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10:50

Mr Martin Halle

Managing Macro Supply Chains in a Post Covid World

According to the OECD and Deloitte, disruption in the supply chains of few essential goods and shortages of key medical products during the COVID-19 outbreak have highlighted the interconnectedness between countries through global value chains and renewed the debate on costs and benefits of globalisation. COVID-19 also disrupted the business world and challenged supply chain reliability. More specifically, recent discussions emphasise the risks and instability associated with the international fragmentation of production. Post-Covid, what are lessons that have been learnt and can be put to practical and effective use to better manage supply chains to ensure efficiency, minimise disruption of supply during unexpected shocks such as those experienced as a result of the pandemic, and improve the bottom line? What role can global governments play and practical policy options that need to be implemented to ensure diversification and resilience in global value chains to ensure effective management and supply of essential goods?

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11:10

Sponsor Video

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11:15

Mr Tobias Becker

Vertical Farming – A way to trigger a farming renaissance in South Africa

Urban farming and especially systematic vertical farming bears the potential to bring healthy and nutritious food closer to urban consumers. With shortest supply chains, close to zero transport, and a sustainably small environmental footprint – especially very low water consumption – this future-oriented technology can serve off-takers, such as retailers, food processors, catering, and hospitality industries. This session will report on the progress and advantages of vertical farming and how this methodology could blend with existing business ecosystems, propel the government agenda forward, and create stable, continuous work for many. With its unique set of challenges, South Africa would greatly benefit from the impact of food security, safety, and self-sufficiency provided by vertical farming.

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11:35

Mr Martin Kingston

A year into COVID-19 Global Pandemic: lessons learnt.

An overview of how business has worked with other social partners in contributing to the country’s response to the pandemic. This includes an overview of how business assisted in developing the South Africa’s healthcare response strategy, modelled different infection scenarios with links to lockdown phases and in 2021, refocused its efforts to support the government-led vaccination programme. Business has also played an instrumental role in contributing to Government’s Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan, highlighting the need for priority interventions and structural reforms to drive business confidence and investment, and therefore growth and job creation. The work undertaken by business in these areas has sought to respond to the implications of the pandemic on key sectors, including the retail and consumer sectors

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11:55

Mr Nakampe Molewa

Mr Rodger George

Top Business Trends that accelerated due to disruptions of the past year.

It is evident that Covid-19 has created new challenges for businesses as they adapt to an operating model in which working from home has become the ‘new normal’. Companies have been forced to accelerate their digital transformation, and cybersecurity has become top of mind for many businesses. Deloitte says as a consequence, technology has become even more important in both our working and personal lives. Despite this rise of technology need, it is noticeable that many organisations still do not provide a ’cyber-safe’ remote-working environment. Where business meetings have traditionally been held in-person, most now take place virtually. What are the trends and risks that have emerged and how can companies adapt and mitigate against these risks? Furthermore, the supply chain disruptions caused by the pandemic could have a potential to affect and impact competitiveness, economic growth as well as job creation. How can companies adopt agile business models that can minimise the impact of future disruptions without affecting their growth and competitiveness?

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12:25

Sponsor Video

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12:35

Mr Beyers van der Merwe

Mr Devin O’Donovan

A changing, but thriving retail sector amidst economic disruptions

South Africa has arguably one of the largest retail markets in sub-Sahara Africa, which has over the years adopted and benchmarked its service and offering to meet international standards and trends. The sector plays an integral role in the economic development and growth of the country and is and continues to be one of the largest employers. Like other sectors of the economy, retail has borne the brunt of the Covid-19 pandemic, and has experienced significant disruption to its operations, business models and supply chains. Without a doubt, there is potential for the sector to grow, particularly given prospects of further economic growth, the emergence of new consumer groups and capital investment aided by favourable government policies. How has the sector been impacted and evolving to remain as a key contributor to the South African economy?

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13:05

Ms Yolanda Cuba

Embracing agility in the next frontier

Businesses which have embraced agility have a better chance to respond and adapt to market disruptions such as those brought about by the Covid-19 pandemic. Indeed, those companies who reacted fast managed to not only respond to the disruption, but also found it relatively easier to continue operating effectively in what is already a dynamic business environment. And the disruption caused by the pandemic further emphasised the importance of agility, particularly in a crisis. Going forward, agility is not just an imperative for success; it is going to be a permanent means for survival. Companies which acknowledge the benefits of an agile operating model and the need for constant change stand a better chance of leap-frogging competitors who are still thinking of agile business models or those yet to recognise their importance and strategic necessity. What sort of business architecture and culture will be needed to survive in a dynamic marketplace where agility is going to be the next frontier for business renewal and growth?

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13:25

Mr Andy Du Plessis

The South African FMCG Sector resilience in adversity

The outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic had a devastating and disruptive impact on the fast-moving consumer goods in South Africa, with supply chains dislocated, consumer demand curtailed and both cash-flow and investor returns were constrained. The series of lockdown restrictions have had a varying degree of impact on the sector, but incredibly, it also demonstrated resilience in the face of such unprecedented uncertainty and future brought about by the pandemic. One can argue that the relatively stable nature of the sector played a part in cushioning it from the worst effects of the lockdown restrictions and attendant decline in consumer demand. It is this reliance, and lessons learnt from responding to adversity, that provides the sector with further opportunity to address other issues key to growth and survival, such as sustainability and to plan for other potential types of future shocks. How does the sector ensure that it is shock-proof from unexpected shocks and its role in the broader national objective of supporting inclusive economic growth are some of the issues that the sector needs to grapple with?

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13:45

Mr Johnny Moloto

Mr Nizam A. Kalla

Mr Terence P. Leluma

Mr Richard Rushton

Re-asserting South Africa as an economic powerhouse in Africa

Without a doubt, the Covid-19 pandemic has exposed the fault lines in the South African economy which has struggled to achieve high growth rates during the past decade. A number of factors have been blamed for the tepid growth, among these lack of structural reforms to improve regulatory and policy certainty, poor policy implementation and the energy crisis due to Eskom’s inability to ensure reliable and cost effective power supply. The pandemic has had a devastating effect on the economy, as evidenced by retrenchments, company closures, particularly in the SME sector, and worsening poverty. The government has responded by adopting an economic reconstruction and recovery plan, which aims to unlock the economy’s potential and includes reforms to attract both domestic and foreign investment. The role of the business sector will be crucial to the success of this plan. However, business stands ready to partner with government to support growth, but still has concerns about inconsistent policy and regulatory implementation. There is need for government and business to narrow the trust deficit and begin to work as a cohesive team to address the economic challenges facing the country, and address worsening inequality and unemployment facing Africa’s most advanced economy.

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14:05

Mr Johann Vorster

Closing Address

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14:20

Summit End

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